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Top signs that your new web project won’t be accessible

We all like to think we do our bit for people with disabilities. If you are running a web project this often means adding a line to the supplier’s contract that the website should “meet accessibility guidelines” or “comply with the Equality’s Act”.But as the project progresses, how do you know if the supplier’s work is going to be accessible? It can be a shock when the site launches and you find out there are some fundamental accessibility issues.The easiest way to determine future performance is to look at past performance. Ask the supplier for a couple of sites they have worked on before that considered accessibility and check them out. If you aren’t sure what you are looking for try some easy checks or ask someone who knows what to look for.If the supplier is reticent about providing previous examples, you have your answer. If they say you can look at any of their previous projects because it’s a standard part of their process then you’ve found a good one - but still check as they could be bluffing.A fundamental requirement for accessibility is that a site is easy for everyone to use. The structure of the website, terminology and general interface all impact this ease of use, and the process for creating the website will determine whether user-needs are being accounted for.

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07 Sep
Web Axe @webaxe
Web managers: Top signs your new web project won't be accessible http://t.co/nGrC3yX6r7 by @alastc #webdev #a11y
29 Aug
Easy Chirp @EasyChirp
Top signs your new web project won't be accessible: http://t.co/dVmR6NSGEW #pm #web #a11y
26 Aug
IBM Accessibility @IBMAccess
Top signs that your new web project won’t be accessible http://t.co/92ZC5E4sPM (via @bdailynews) #a11y #accessibility
26 Aug
Web Axe @webaxe
RT @PayPalInclusive: Must read for web managers: Top signs your new web project won't be accessible: http://t.co/ODtHsoTJBn by @alastc